Company details on stationery and at business premises

Out-Law Guide | 17 Jun 2010 | 12:43 pm | 1 min. read

This guide is based on UK law as at 1st February 2010, unless otherwise stated. A company is legally required to publicise its name, address and certain other details on business stationery and to...

This guide is based on UK law as at 1st February 2010, unless otherwise stated.

A company is legally required to publicise its name, address and certain other details on business stationery and to display its name at its business premises. The rules are listed below.

Business letters and order forms must include in legible characters a company’s:

  • full name;
  • registered number;
  • registered office address;
  • the part of the UK where the company is registered.

If the company is exempt from using the word ‘limited’ in its name, it also needs to state that it is a limited company. If a business letter names a director of the company (other than in the text or as a signatory), all directors must be named.

All other business stationery must disclose the company’s full name in a form that is capable of being read with the naked eye. This includes sales literature, cheques and all correspondence.

Emails – the rules for business letters, order forms and other business stationery apply whether in hard or soft copy form. Companies therefore need to ensure that a standard footer containing the requisite details is added at the end of all emails. Where several companies operate from the same email address, the footer needs to include details for all the companies on whose behalf the email might be sent. (See also: Email notices and email footers, an OUT-LAW guide)

A company’s website must carry the same details as its business letters and order forms. Where a group of companies shares a website, the details for all companies that make use of the site and are identified on it need to appear.

Business premises – a company is required to display its full name at its registered office and at any location at which it keeps company records available for inspection. In addition, the name must also be on show at any other site where the company carries on business. That will include any premises from which the company operates, even if that operation is small scale or infrequent. The name needs to be displayed in such a way that it can be easily seen by a visitor. Companies whose activities put their directors at serious risk of violence or intimidation can be exempt from these requirements.